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Rosewood Travel Cutlery by WH Wragg

Reference
82678
Height
7 1/4" (18.15 cm)
Width
0 3/4" (1.9 cm)
Depth
0 1/2" (1.14 cm)
An interlocking set of WH Wragg patent travel cutlery made of steel and rosewood with pewter bands.

Wragg offered this form of cutlery with either rosewood or ebony handles and either the fork or the knife is typically stamped 'WH Wragg Patentee'. This set has an extra mark to the A of Patentee causing it to look like a military broad arrow mark but this is purely coincidence.

The design, being very compact and offering easy protection to both the blade and fork whilst travelling, was popular through most of the 19th century. Later examples, by both English and French makers, tend to have a more rounded grip and brass bands instead of pewter. It is known that examples were also produced by Wragg with the additional stamp of 'Emigrant Knife' to the blade. Presumably this was to capitalise on the increased numbers travelling to Australia, New Zealand and America following the gold rushes. WH Wragg also produced a variety of other folding knives some of which were also stamped Sheffield, a city synonymous with cutlery.

The handles are both stamped with the number 4 to identify them to each other, incase the owner had more than one set. This is quite common to Wragg travel cutlery.

Whether WH Wragg actually took out a patent or not is unknown. It was not uncommon for manufacturers to mark their work as patented even if it wasn't to offer some degree of protection. Little is known of WH Wragg although there were a number of different Wraggs working as cutlers in Sheffield. It is possible most were related to each other and Wraggs continued to make knives in Sheffield well into the 20th century.

This set is likely to be mid 19th Century in date.

Height
7 1/4" (18.15 cm)
Width
0 3/4" (1.9 cm)
Depth
0 1/2" (1.14 cm)
Period
Mid 19th Century
Medium
Steel, Rosewood, Pewter
Origin
England
Signed
WH Wragg Patentee
Style
Campaign Cutlery
Condition
Good, some movement of the blade to the handle but this is fairly typical.
Edition
A Cites certificate will be needed if exported